LOW CARB SLOW COOKER – Sarah Flower

Sarah Flower is a nutritionist, a member of the Naturopathic Nutrition Association Naturopathic Nutrition Association (nna-uk.com) and The Nutrition Society The Nutrition Society and is Jamie Oliver Food Revolution Ambassador for Devon.

Additionally, the logos of the Network Health Digest magazine NHD – The magazine for Dietitians, Nutritionists and Healthcare Professionals and the College of Medicine and Integrated Health College of Medicine and Integrated Health appear on her website Sarah Flower Nutritionist Online Consultations Allergy Gut Health United Kingdom There’s a second website, Everyday SugarFree

Sarah Flower has written Slow Cook Fast Food (2010), The Everyday Halogen Oven Cookbook (2011), Perfect Baking With Your Halogen Oven (2011), Halogen Cooking For Two (2011), Eat Well Spend Less (2011), The Healthy Lifestyle Diet Cookbook (2012), How to Cook With a Halogen Oven (2012), The Complete Halogen Oven Cookbook (2013), Everyday Halogen Family Cookbook (2013), The Healthy Halogen Cookbook (2013), The Busy Mum’s Plan Ahead Cookbook (2014),Halogen One Pot Cooking (2014), Low Carb Slow Cooker (2017),The Sugar-Free Family Cookbook (2017), Eating to Beat Type 2 Diabetes (2018),The Part-Time Vegan (2018), The Healthy Slow Cooker Cookbook (2019), Slow Cooker Family Classics (2019) The Keto Slow Cooker (2020), Keto Slow Cooker Cookbook (2020), Slow Cooker For Less (2021)

Ms Flower has also written for The Sun, Daily Mail, Bella, Healthista and Top Santé.

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Low Carb Slow Cooker starts with an explanation of slow cookers and the basic methods of using them, which is useful if you haven’t used a slow cooker before. This is followed by very basic store cupboard, fridge and freezer staples lists.

Unusually for a British cookbook, Sarah Flower works in net carbs. If you want to frighten yourself, add the fibre to get total carbs. Very few of the recipes could be considered keto and many of the low carb recipes are rather generous with the carbage.

There’s a Broccoli and Stilton soup at 8.6g net carbs per serving and a Celery and Stilton soup at 5.1g net carbs per serving. Either of these could make a ‘festive season’ leftovers lunch. Chilli and prawn soup 4.7g net carbs per serving, looks interesting.

Somehow, Nettle soup comes out at 17.1g net carbs per serving. This is definitely something to try, as soon as you see nettles sprouting in March. Do wear gloves though if not feeling brave ! VIDEO: COOKING WITH JULIE MONTAGU (bottom video).

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Low carb meat dishes next, with lamb moussaka at 9.8g net carbs per serving followed by beef goulash at 13.3g net carbs per serving, but it may be lower carb if you miss out the wine. Reggae beef uses coconut flour to flour diced beef chunks, but it’s otherwise not particularly Caribbean 9.4g net carbs per serving. Tunisian lamb comes in at 10.1g net carbs per serving but isn’t particularly Maghreb either3.

The daube of beef sounds rather good. I would use better beef than stewing beef however, as there’s no point in wasting good red wine and brandy on poorer quality meat. After 8-10 hours cooking. the beef should be sublime and only 9.9g net carbs per serving.

Another dish which should work well in a slow cooker is slow-cooked leg of lamb and just 1.9g net carbs per serving. Sarah Flower states that a 1.5kg leg of lamb should feed eight people. If the hungry horde misses roast potatoes, try roasting a mixture of swede (rutabaga), celeriac, turnip, pumpkin and butternut squash. For mash, mash potato squash is a very good substitute.

Slow-cooked Festive gammon is only 2.5g net carbs per serving, but maybe one to avoid if you can’t find uncured gammon, without additives. pork tenderloin (3.4g net carbs per serving), pork goulash (9.9g net carbs per serving), cider and apple pork fillet (9.9g net carbs per serving), and pulled pork (4.7g net carbs per serving) all look good.

Photo by Théroigne S G B Russell

There are low carb versions of lamb Rogan Josh, beef Stroganoff, lasagne and so forth, none of which look particularly exciting or low carb. Stifado at 10.6g net carbs per 100g is something more appealing, using 1kg of stewing beef, slow-cooked for 8-10 hours.

There are several chicken dishes which could be mde in the kitchen here: Herby lemon and garlic chicken (3.6g net carbs per stuffing), chicken Vindaloo (5.7g net carbs per serving), a slow-cooked whole chicken, creamy mushroom and port chicken (9.8g net carbs per serving) jerk chicken (5.4g net carbs per serving) and tandoori chicken (6.1g net carbs).

Stour Valley Game 09/05/20 Photo by Théroigne S B G Russell

Seen for the first time in a cook book, low carb Christmas pudding (13.3g net carbs per serving) and if made with vegetarian suet, it’s gluten free. Pretty much all of the other dessert and cake recipes are made with sweeteners, as well.

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Maison Keto rarely features cakes, desserts and puddings, because sweeteners can provoke an insulin spike in some people. Insulin is not just the key for cells to enable them to receive glucose for energy, it’s also the fat storage hormone. High insulin doesn’t help weight loss. Also, if people are in the habit of consuming cupcakes, muffins, puddings etc and switch to low carb versions with the aid of sweeteners, they aren’t changing their lifestyle and that could mean that they fail to stick to low carb or keto.

The vegetarian dishes are much higher in net carbs than expected eg 22.5g net carbs per serving for cauliflower curry but there’s a crustless spinach and courgette quiche for 2.6g net carbs per slice, mushroom stroganoff is 8.9g net carbs per serving and goat’s cheese spinach and sun-dried tomato frittata is 4g net carbs per serving.

Some of the recipes serve up to eight people and could be used to batch cook for the freezer.

Beautiful photography. One of the recipes vegetable and chickpea crumbly, doesn’t have any chickpeas in the ingredients. Elsewhere, crème fraîche becomes crème fresh.

If you can get it cheaply from a boot fair or charity shop, say 50p or £1, I’d buy it just for the Christmas pud, goulash, quiches , pork dishes and daube of beef. Otherwise, it’s a NO. There are better books out there.

B&M the discount store, has a video which is basically a slow cooker fry up. Omit the baked beans for low carbers and you might want to add slices of Black pudding instead of canned tomatoes.

Recipe: Easy Slow Cooker Fry-Up (bmstores.co.uk)

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